paper piles

oldies but goodies

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Part of Cultural Resource Management is keeping track of the the pests that want to destroy the collections. We set traps to document what type of bugs are in different areas so we can mitigate it better.Last week was particularly heinous. Huge spiders and even a snake. I dutifully entered the number and type of pests into the database but I’ll be honest. It was gross. 

Part of Cultural Resource Management is keeping track of the the pests that want to destroy the collections. We set traps to document what type of bugs are in different areas so we can mitigate it better.

Last week was particularly heinous. Huge spiders and even a snake. I dutifully entered the number and type of pests into the database but I’ll be honest. It was gross. 

Filed under NPS Academy SCA CRM integrated pest management

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Remember when I told you about lighting the pile for Establishment Day? Well, after a week volunteer colliers raked it out. It was a successful burn. 

One of them told me this type of charcoal is the best for barbecues. 

Filed under Hopewell Furnace charcoal SCA NPS Academy

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What time is it? Apple time!

I was walking to work one morning and noticed that the apple orchard was looking really good! I stopped to take some photos. Employees get apples for free, so I’m looking forward to trying the historic varieties. 

Filed under SCA NPS Academy Hopewell Furnace apples

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Daniel Boone had houses all over the country but he was born in this one. That makes it special.

For those wondering but not remembering their middle school history class, Boone is famous for settling Kentucky. He’s not to be confused with Davy Crockett (a completely different dude and time period). 

Filed under daniel boone homestead

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The event at Daniel Boone Homestead was set up so you could visit the soldier encampments. I spoke with one reenactor from Virginia for a long time and he gave me the deets on what it’s like to reenact battles as a hobby. I ended putting on my Ethnographer Hat. He had a lot of fascinating things to say. Has anyone done an ethnography on this? Surely, they must have. 

There was a man who played historic instruments. He played the original version of “Yankee Doodle” for us. Fun fact: It does not sound like the version we know today. But it’s adjacent to it, if that makes sense. 

The Boone blacksmith shop was open. A kid asked the smith to make a horse shoe…and he did, right on the spot. It was awesome. 

Filed under daniel boone homestead

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I went on a solo adventure to the Daniel Boone Homestead to see their Revolutionary War Battle reenactment. I had never visited the Homestead before. It’s a real nice place!

During the battle they explained different tactics and strategies the soldiers would’ve used. It was pretty neat. 

Filed under daniel boone homestead red coats

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I went to the T.E.A. Factory in downtown Reading and saw an experimental play called “May Be Honest”. Downtown Reading is always kinda desolate and sad, with all the abandoned factories about. 

The play was about the trial of Susanna Cox, who I’ve talked about before in this blog. The first part of the play took place in the room above. But then the audience is divided into 3 groups and taken to 3 different rooms to see different scenes. One of the scenes was the story of Susanna Cox from a contemporary perspective. There was a television with news broadcasts about the trial and different talking heads commenting on it. It was really interesting and well done!

There was a Police Box in the main hallway. So I figured the Doctor must’ve stopped by too. 

But yeah, bravo local theatre. Good show!

  



Filed under free time theatre may be honest t.e.a. factory